Multiple choices

 

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Making multiple choices

A few people sit around filling in paperwork and using tablets in a library

What's coming up

This activity will help you to understand how to select answers from multiple choice options on an online form. With all multiple choices, you select one or more answers from a list of options. They can look slightly different, but they all work in a similar way.

Let's look at how the main types work.

Start activity
A computer screen shows examples of radio buttons

Radio buttons

To use radio buttons, you click on the radio button next to the response you want to choose as an answer. You can only click one button.

To change your answer, you just need to click on a different button.

Using radio buttons

Let’s practise using radio buttons together.

On the next slide is a practice that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right side of the screen.

Using radio buttons

Using radio buttons

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise using radio buttons when completing an online form.

This exercise has no soundtrack and in order to complete it, you need to click on a radio button to confirm your gender. Radio buttons are small circular options on an online form. This is to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment.

If a mistake is made during this exercise, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

Checkboxes

Checkboxes let you select more than one option.

To change an answer, click the box again to deselect it.

A computer screen shows examples of check boxes
A computer screen shows a drop-down list using the year of birth as an example

Drop-down lists

Drop-down lists are a bit different. You first select the box (or the arrow next to it) to reveal a list of options.

You can only select one option.

Using drop-down lists

Let’s practise using drop-down lists together.

On the next slide is a practise that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right hand side of the screen.

Using drop-down lists

Using drop-down lists

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise using drop down lists when completing an online form.

This exercise has no soundtrack and in order to complete it, you need to select an option from a drop down list in the qualifications section of a registraion form. This is to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment.

If a mistake is made during this exercise, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

List boxes

Checkboxes, radio buttons and drop-downs are the most common multiple choices, but sometimes a site might use other ways of making a multiple choice. If you see one of these it will work like the fields you've seen here.

This example is a list box – it works like a drop-down list but you can choose more than one answer.

A computer screen shows a drop-down list where multiple options can be selected

Getting help

Most online forms will offer you advice on how to complete them. Let's look at the ones you're most likely to come across.

In this question, Barbara's unsure what 'dependent children' means.

She can select the Need help with the meaning 'dependent children'? text to get an explanation of what this means to help her answer the question.

An example of a question on a digital registration form where there is a smaller link below the main question that once clicked, helps explain the meaning of a term featured in the question
Shows examples of icons and images of help buttons in differnt colours to the accompanying text to make it easier to find

Help options are often displayed using images or icons rather than words and sentences. They work in the same way – you click on them to get more information.

Here are some of the popular ones you might see: question marks, i icons or help links. These are often in a different colour to the question text so you can see them easily.

You can always change your answer to multiple-choice questions. But if you do move on and then realise you've made a mistake you can often go back and change it.

If there's a back button on the site itself, use that rather than the one on your browser. If you can't go back, you'll usually be able to change your answers later on a separate screen.

Once you select 'submit' you may not be able to change your answers, so make sure you check each page carefully before you move on.

And example registration summary is filled in with details. Next to each line is an edit button incase you need to change any details afterwards
An example registration form including drop-down lists for date of birth, radio buttons for gender and check boxes for job type questions

As you've seen, multiple-choice questions can each look a bit different. They all work in the same way though.

With radio buttons you can only select one option. With checkboxes you can select more than one. Drop-down lists are usually to select one option, but can be more.

The instructions on the form will usually tell you if you can select more than one option.

How to correct a mistake

Let’s have a look at how to correct a mistake in an online form.

On the next slide is a practice activity that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right side of the screen.

How to correct a mistake

How to correct a mistake

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise using correcting a mistake in an online form.

This exercise has no soundtrack and in order to complete it, you need to correct a missing drop down box that you forgot to complete when doing the form. This is to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment.

If a mistake is made during this exercise, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

Using postcodes

Let’s have a look at how to add a postcode to an online form.

On the next slide is a practice activity that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right side of the screen.

Using postcodes

Using postcodes

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise entering numbners into an online search form.

This exercise has no soundtrack and in order to complete it, you need to enter a post code into a shop location search map and then select the correct suburb from the drop down menu. This is to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment.

If a mistake is made during this exercise, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

Well done!

Congratulations, you've come to the end of the Multiple choice activity.

You've learnt about how to use radio buttons, checkboxes and drop-down lists and how to correct a mistake in an online form.

A range of forms on a work desk including a digital form on a tablet