The 'click' factor

 

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The 'click' factor'

a computer mouse showing left and right buttons

What's coming up

A mouse is great for moving the cursor around the screen and for selecting items on the screen. But it can do a lot more than that.

In this activity, let's look at some of the other things you can do using the left mouse button and the right mouse button.

Start activity

Radio buttons and checkboxes

Radio buttons and checkboxes are simple ways to answer questions online, but what's the difference between them?

an example of radio buttons that are often used in online quizzes and forms
an example of a radio button that has been selected

Radio buttons

Radio buttons are normally circles. They are used when there's only one answer allowed. For example 'What day of the week is it?' would be an ideal question for a radio button.

A selected radio button will have a dot inside it.

Checkboxes

Checkboxes are often squares. They allow you to select one or more answers at the same time. For example, 'on which days do you use a computer?' would be a good question for checkboxes, as you may want to select more than one day as your answer.

A selected checkbox will have a tick or a cross inside it.

an example of a three checkboxes where two have been selected

Online questions

Now you can try answering an online question using a radio button.

On the next slide is a practice that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right hand side of the screen.

Online questions

Online questions

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise selecting a radio button by clicking an option on the screen.

This exercise has no sound track.

To successfully complete the exercise, you need to decide what the capital city of Australia is and click on the correct answer.

This exercise is used to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment. If a mistake is made, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

Double clicking

You've seen how to select items with a single click of the left mouse button. But sometimes you need to double click. In the next slide, you can watch a video that demonstrates the difference between a single and a double click. Press the 'Continue' button and then play the video.

Let's have a go

Now you can try double-clicking on an icon to open it.

On the next slide is a practice that includes some steps to try yourself. Select the Continue button below to begin and then follow the instructions on the right hand side of the screen.

Let’s have a go

Let’s have a go

This is an interactive exercise that allows learners to practise double clicking.

This exercise has no sound track.

To successfully complete the exercise, you need to double click a desktop folder and then go through a series of steps to double click items to open them, in order to get to a receipe in a recipe folder on a computer.

This exercise is used to encourage confidence using the internet by practising a simple exercise in a simulated environment. If a mistake is made, there will be a prompt to ask you to try it again. If another mistake is made, the video will show you how to complete that section of the exercise.

The right mouse button

Most of the time you will use the left button on the mouse, but there's also another button you need to know about.

Clicking the right mouse button brings up a shortcut menu of useful options. The options that appear will depend on what the cursor is hovering over when you right click.

clicking the right mouse button displays a shortcut menu

Clicking with the right mouse button

You've seen how to select items with a single click of the left mouse button. You can also use the right mouse button to open useful menu items. In the next slide, you can watch a video that demonstrates how useful options appear when you right mouse click (also known as 'right click') on items on the desktop. Press the 'Continue' button and then play the video.

Congratulations!

Well done, you've come to the end of The click factor activity.

You've learnt how to use the mouse to select a radio button, how to double-click to open folders and programs and how to use the right mouse button to display a menu of options.

In the next activity, Scrolling, you'll learn why scrolling is useful when you're reading a web page.

a lady browsing the internet on a desktop computer